Best Hollywood Movies based on Physics Facts

hollywood si-fi-films

There are numerous Hollywood movies that are based on fictional physics facts but due to extreme special effects we believe these can be real in the coming future. Since decades Hollywood has been the front runner in the production of many sci-fi films that have earned huge bucks at the Box Office.

If education on science is what you are seeking, then please remember that movies are NOT the best source as movies plot are exaggerated for entertainment purposes and so might be the scientific facts portrayed. Some Hollywood movies get so much carried away with the story narration that scientific relevance checks are often given a skip.

Interstellar

Interstellar

Pacing, or a lack thereof, becomes one of the things which utterly saps the life out of this movie. Where most movies have a three act structure, Interstellar has five acts. Two of them are worth watching. The other three are a monument to the fact that nobody involved in the production would dare take a red pen to Mr. Nolan’s bloated script. In so much as Interstellar wants to be a story about astronauts facing an impossible task on the other side of the galaxy, it’s also firmly rooted in a human interest story set on Earth. Where the latter should have been left on the editing room floor, Nolan makes the story on Earth run parallel to the story in space.

Gravity

Gravity

A great movie is hard to define. So let Gravity do it for you. With enthralling detail, it offers thrills, humor, dazzle, disaster, poetic vision and mythic reach. Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey set the bar for philosophical exploration of an unknowable universe by gazing outward. With deceptive simplicity, Gravity looks inward at something closer at hand but just as profound: the intricacies of the human heart.

2001 a space Odyssey

2001 a space Odyssey

The mystical subtext and psychedelic stargate sequence ensured that the film initially attracted a cult audience, with John Lennon suggesting it should be screened perpetually in a specially-built temple. But 2001 is also justly celebrated for its visuals and Oscar-winning effects, which combined revolutionary front-projection techniques with Douglas Trumbull’s model work to convey a sense of the infinite vastness of space.

Theory of everything

Theory of everything

Based on a popular young-adult novel by Nicola Yoon and directed by Stella Meghie, “Everything, Everything” tells what happens when Maddie meets Olly , the literal Boy Next Door. As they become acquainted over elaborate scenarios involving the destruction of a luckless Bundt cake, it becomes clear that these two angelic teens are meant for each other. Fireworks even go off when they share a forbidden kiss!  Soon, Maddie’s planned her escape — into a world that may kill her.

Apollo 13

Apollo 13

Apollo 13, Ron Howard’s wonderfully low-key, documentary-like dramatization of the ill-fated lunar mission of that name, is a thrilling tribute to the ingenuity, courage, teamwork, and professionalism of the astronauts and ground crew who turned America’s first outer-space disaster from an account of frustration and potential tragedy into a triumphant rescue story.

Cube

Cube

This film has more in substance than most big budget hollywood “event” movies rolled into one. The film follows the perils of a group of canadian civilians imprisoned in a futuristic “RUBICK’S CUBE” style jail from which there is seemingly no escape. They have no idea how they got there, or who put them there, all they know is they have to escape…..fast. This film is reminiscent of LORD OF THE FLIES, and how it showed mankind at it’s worst when things go bad. The film chronicles paranoia, suspicion and fear. MAURICE DEAN WINT, gives a brilliant performance. In fact, this man’s acting ability, makes the film worthwhile. The rest of the cast is fantastic as well.

The Martian

The Martian

Set in the near future, THE MARTIAN stars Matt Damon as Mark Watney, the botanist on NASA’s manned Ares 3 mission to Mars. Watney and the rest of the crew are working on Mars when a storm forces them to evacuate early. But when Watney’s knocked unconscious and isn’t in sight, mission commander Lewis (Jessica Chastain), pilot Martinez (Michael Peña), and specialists Beck (Sebastian Stan), Vogel (Aksel Hennie), and Johanssen (Kate Mara), despondently presume him dead and leave him behind. Read More

Particle fever

Particle fever

It helps that the stakes at the center of the film are, literally, astronomical. Many of the people interviewed explain how the search for the elusive Higgs boson – a.k.a. “the God particle” – could unlock the universe as we know it. Billions upon billions of dollars were invested in creating the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, built and operated by over 10,000 scientists and engineers from over 100 countries. The scientific world has gone all-in on this massive facility, which depends on a 27 kilometre-long tube that circulates and smashes particles at warp speeds. The documentary, in turn, follows a group a physicists as the facility finally flips the on switch. Failure, many say, will mean the end of physics research as we know it. Read More

Inception

Inception

The concept of a dream within a dream is an important one for Inception. Cobb and his cohorts construct dreams like nesting dolls to confuse their subjects. Wake up, you’re still dreaming. Wake up again, and you may be dreaming still. Each dream-layer accesses a deeper level of subconscious. Read More